Call for volunteer Site Captains to coordinate coastal cleanups in Singapore – deadline: 15 March 2015!

The volunteer coordinators of the International Coastal Cleanup in Singapore are conducting a recruitment exercise to search for motivated individuals who want to contribute to the betterment of the marine environment.

Volunteers will conduct evaluations of beaches and mangroves prior to cleanups, learn about marine life, liase with Organisers, help plan workshops, process data, conduct outreach activities as well as leading by example during beach and mangrove cleanups!

We are looking for Site Buddies and Site Captains who are able to commit to our 2015 Calendar of events. Check the full calendar of dates. If you fit the bill and can make the dates, sign up to join the ICCS Otters!

017_iccs-KranjiEast-21sep2013[AdrianeLee]

We are a dedicated team who have been coordinating the International Coastal Cleanup in Singapore for more than a decade. We work with Organisers from more than 60 organisations and institutions who lead some 4,000 volunteers to the beach and mangroves of Singapore in September, and with Organisers of Year-Round Coastal Cleanups.

We keep meetings and emails to a minimum in order to sustain this effort alongside our regular jobs long-term. So to work with us, you need to be responsive and dedicated. If unfamiliar, you will be introduced to our use of digital tools and field-preparation.

If you think this sounds like something you could do, we would be most happy to welcome you!

To join us, sign up here by 15 Mar 2015!

See you on the beach!

Cheerio!

Sivasothi

N. Sivasothi
Coordinator,
International Coastal Cleanup Singapore
Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum
& Department of Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore


What do ICCS Zone Captains do?

Shoreline recces
09iccs-recce_tanah-merah-7_05may2013[ezraho]

Workshop Tutorials
2013-07-03 20.39.02

Just a few meetings!
20150302 ICCS Otters Mtg 1

ICCS Lecture dialogues
50_ICCS_Lecture-03aug2013[adrianlee]

School Talks
06iccs-talk-queenstown-primary-23apr2012

Briefing volunteers
007iccs-pandan_mangrove-11sep2010[kpinto]

Coastal cleanup!
269_iccs-KranjiEast-21sep2013[awks]

Getting stuck!
103ICCSpandanmangrove-12sep2009[as]

Every piece counts
029iccs-pandan_mangrove-11sep2010[kpinto]

Weighing trash
55preNDcoastalcleanup-04aug2012

Feeling accomplished!
59iccs-pandan_mangrove-11sep2010[dling]

Washing gloves!
174_iccs-KranjiEast-21sep2013[AdrianeLee]

Data processing
192_iccs-KranjiEast-21sep2013[AdrianeLee]

Fellowship through year-round action
42_PreNatiDay_MangroveCleanup-04 aug2012[andydinesh]

‘Ocean plastic pollution’s shocking death toll on endangered animals’

“Nearly 700 species of marine animal have been recorded as having encountered human-made debris such as plastic and glass according to the most comprehensive impact study in more than a decade. are being harmed or killed by the trash we toss into the seas.”

Emily Gert at TakePart reports on a new review study which examined scientific reports and revealed that hundreds of species of animals are being harmed or killed by marine trash. And of the trash which includes metal, glass and paper, it is “plastic … [which] turned up in almost 92% of animal-meets-marine debris reports,” according to a study published in Marine Pollution Bulletin.

Screenshot

Gall and Thompson (2015) report a total of 44,006 incidents of individual animals across 395 species that had eaten plastic bits or been tangled in plastic rope or netting. Around 80 percent of the time, these encounters injured or killed the animal.

Reports of entanglement in plastic include these critically endangered turtles:

  • 138 hawksbill turtles,
  • 73 Kemp’s Ridley turtles, and
  • 62 leatherback sea turtles.

30,896 reports were of marine mammals tangled in ropes or netting, including:

  • 215 Hawaiian monk seals (critically endangered)
  • 38 northern right whales (endangered),
  • 3,835 northern fur seals and
  • 3,587 California sea lions.

In 174 records, more than 150 species of seabirds were tangled in or eating plastic, including:

  • 3,444 northern fulmars,
  • 1,674 Atlantic puffins,
  • 971 Laysan albatross, and
  • 895 greater shearwaters.

“The researchers stressed that their findings were “an underestimate of the impacts of marine debris” on marine animals.

They noted, however, that least we’re past denying the problem.”

Links