Site Allocation Exercise 3 – 76% of sites allocated for ICCS in Sep 2015!

Friday evenings, 22 May & 26 Jun 2015: 7.00pm @ NUS Faculty of Science Active Learning Room [S16-03] – The ICCS Otters conducted the second and third Site Allocation Exercise (SAX2/SAX3) in preparation for ICCS 2015, scheduled for 19 Sep 2015.

ICCS SAX3 03

At SAX1 on 24 Apr 2015, 33 organisations had registered 1,946 volunteers for ICCS. Two months later at SAX3, there were 60 organisations comprising 3,507 volunteers which have registered for ICCS 2015. This means three-quarters of our shores capacity has been met and we expect more to trickle in.

Zone Captains have had to juggle some organisations between sites in order to fit their estimated participation while taking into consideration their logistical needs (e.g. access to facilities) – and organisers were confirmation at their sites.

As of now, the zone status are:

  1. North-West – 81% filled; three sites open
  2. North-East – 71% filled; two sites open, two almost full
  3. Pulau Ubin – 59% filled; five sites open, one almost full
  4. Changi – 100% filled; one site almost full
  5. Tanah Merah – 64% filled; five sites open
  6. East Coast – 100% filled; all sites full
  7. South – 73% filled; three sites open, one almost full

For details, see status.coastalcleanupsingapore.org:

ICCS Status 2

Next, the ICCS team will focus on the Organiser’s Workshop and joint recces before the final event. We look forward to working with our Organisers closely for ICCS 2015!

ICCS @ Festival of Biodiversity 2015: What can we do for our oceans?

27 & 28 June 2015 – With the help of passionate volunteers, ICCS headed down to VivoCity with the NUS Toddycats for Festival of Biodiversity 2015! The festival, an initiative by NParks and the Biodiversity Roundtable actively engages members of the public since 2012 to celebrate our local flora and fauna.

Do read more about the collective NUS Toddycats! effort at Festival of Biodiversity 2015 here!

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Left: Amanda Ng talking about the Dugong (Dugong dugon)
Right: Wu Bokai talking about the Small-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinerea)
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Left: Letchumi Mani shares about Horseshoe crabs on our shores (family: Limulidae)
Right: Fascinated by the Dugong!
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Left: Lesley Chng sharing about mangrove snakes
Right: Foo Maosheng holds up the majestic fruit of the Nipah palm (Nypa fruticans)
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Left: Max Khoo talking about the Small-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinerea) and sharing stories about the Smooth-coated Otters (Lutrogale perspicillata) in Singapore!
Right: Ng Kai Scene talking about the Giant Mudskipper in our mangroves (Periophthalmodon schlosseri)
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Left: Teo Kah Ming talking about the threat marine trash poses to our biodiversity
Right: Nishtha Anand talking about mangrove fishes!
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Left: Nicholas Yap talking about Stripe-nosed Halfbeak (Zenarchopterus buffonis)
Right: Sofina Ng sharing stories about the Dugong (Dugong dugon)

There were many more volunteers who spent the two days helping us spread messages from our seas, and we couldn’t be more grateful to them – they were up on their feet for hours, some nearly loosing their voice after constant talking!

Thank you to 34 wonderful volunteers who took different shifts throughout the two days: Theresa Su, Chris Zheng, Chua Li En Jacqueline, Erika Ivana Halim, Eyu Xue Yi, Kwok Yan Hoe, Lim Jin Hong, Low Xiang Hui, Lynette Ying, Mah Guo Wei, Max Khoo De Yuan, Neo Meng Yang, Ng Chao Xiang, Ng Kai Scene, Ng Wei Ling Amanda, Nur Azarina Khamis, Ong Yue Qi, Seah Shi Qi Cheyanne, Seah Shi’en Maryann, Sofina Ng, Steffi Loe, Tan Shiao Ying, Teo Kia Meng, Vincent Ong, Wang Jialun, Wong Siew Lien, Yang Yi Yong, Nicholas Yap, Nishtha Anand, Teo Kah Ming, Lesley Chng, Foo Maosheng, and Letchumi Mani. Lastly, thank you to Ng Chao Xiang and Adriane Lee for helping us with photography!

These outreach events hold great significance in the nature community. Not only does it bring everyone together with the common goal of raising awareness about our natural habitats, but also gives us an opportunity to interact with members of the public and encourage a greater appreciation for local biodiversity. Preparation for such events may be tiring, but after two days of being able to share what we are passionate about, we can definitely say it’s worth it!

Here’s to Festival of Biodiversity 2016 next year!