COVID-19 lockdown in Asia? Never fear, the marine conservation community goes online as never before!

As Singapore and other countries observe physical distancing, restriction of movement, closure of beaches and access to mangroves  to reduce COID-19 infections in the community, the events calendar for groups in Singapore evaporated. 

Gradually and admirably, a plethora of activity has been offered online, both locally, regionally and globally, such that we can barely keep up! Most news of such events are circulated through Facebook and I tried to highlight these on the International Coastal Cleanup Singapore Facebook page at https://fb.com/iccsg – so do follow that if you are keen. It certainly is a motivational and educational resource which has emerged online as never before.

Many events are long past us, but several are recorded for you to catch up with. Here are some highlights:

“Stories featuring our native wildlife” by Naked hermit Crabs features “Storytelling by Halley and November” [link]. 

Halley  November

 

Gren Nudge interns took to Facebook Live to chat about working at a social enterprise. A great way for youth to learn from their peers, they had many lessons to impart about how they found their internships, the nature of the work, and were cheerful about challenges they face. This recording is something I am pointing my students towards. 

Green Nudge interns

 

ADEX Pixel Virtual Expo’s “Global Vision with Local Social Enterprises – Ocean Plastic Pollution” [link; panel begins after 28:00]: This next highlight was a real find for us in ICCS! I was preparing an advert for another session and realised this was live! It was a lovely session with driven, analytical and hopeful people determined to make a difference, and who spoke with great camaraderie.

I will be sharing this with the coastal cleanup community. There was another session, “Plastic Waste: An inconvenient truth for South-East Asia region – what would work for us?” [link], which I too will catchup with later.ADEX-PlasticPollution

ADEX really meant it when they claimed its the World’s First Digital Dive Show. There are a diversity of offerings on their site at https://www.facebook.com/pg/AsiaDiveExpo/videos/ – if you are interested in marine conservation in Singapore and Asia, you have plenty of exposure to this wonderful community of people!

ADEX_Expo

The Society for Conservation Biology Malaysia celebrated World Turtle Day with an Open House on 26 & 27 May 2020. It was thrilling to hear so many regional experts present on YouTube Live. I especially loved the session of the Malaysian old guard who trotted out to share their experiences frankly. All the advisors to Singapore’s marine turtle conservation efforts were speaking over the two days and the videos are all available on SCB’s YouTube page [link].

SCB-WorldTurtleDay

 

And there is still more to come listen to – this Friday 10th June 2020, scientists in Asia come together to speak about these ancient species on the 1st International Horseshoe Crab Day 2020. Just register at http://bit.ly/HSCsymposium

HSCday2020

 

Amidst the marking of exam papers in May, I responded to excitement over our smooth-coated otters wandering the city during Singapore’s COVID-19 lockdown. It was an opportunity for outreach to a wider audience through print and social media, and the three local radio/online interview sessions were:

  1. 19 May 2020 on One Radio 91.3FM with FD & Glenn [link; 48:30 mins video]
  2. 23 May 2020 on Money FM 89.3 with Glenn van Zutphen & Neil Humphreys [link; 18:29 mins audio]
  3. 27 May 2020 on Mothership.sg with Yeo Tsiu Wen & Zheng Zhangxin on World Otter Day [link; 60mins video]

Otters 91 3

 

These were a sample, there is much more online. The marine community responded wonderfully with these diverse range of marine conservation sessions from technical seminars to interviews, discussions and story-telling for children. While we all miss the sea and our shores, the work does continue – so you can keep learning and share news of relevant sessions with your friends.

Stay safe and stay informed, everyone!

ICC Asia Pacific Regional Conference @ Hong Kong, 16-18 Nov 2016

Thanks to Ocean Conservancy and Ecozine, who coordinate the Hong Kong cleanups, International Coastal Cleanup coordinators from Asia Pacific and Ocean Conservancy will meet to share and learn from each other.

NewImage

Attend the Biodiversity of Singapore Symposium IV on Sat 01 Aug 2015 @ NUS

BoSS IV 2015 publicity poster

ICCS conducts public education about issues pertaining to threats faced by marine and mangrove ecosystems. To expose yourself to other issues in the local biodiversity scene, the Biodiversity of Singapore Symposium is a full day event held every four years by the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum. It aims to update the Singaporean community of changes to the local biodiversity landscape, and if you would like to find out more about them and past symposia, do visit their webpage at biodiversitysg4.wordpress.com/about.

The fourth Biodiversity of Singapore Symposium, to be held at NUS University Auditorium 2 on Sat 01 Aug 2015 explores the theme of “What’s Next?”, alluding to the changing Biodiversity and Conservation landscape of Singapore. Researchers, managers, educators and conservationists will share you news from Singapore’s biodiversity landscape and inspire youth to play a greater role in biodiversity and the environment in Singapore.

SIGN UP FOR BOSS HERE!

To defray costs, the symposium registration fee is $10/person and $6/student. Two hefty teas to mingle over are provided between sessions, so you will be well fed!

To find out more about BoSS IV, visit biodiversitysg4.wordpress.com or email boss4@nus.edu.sg.

John Kerry (US State Dept) asks, “What will you do to help protect the ocean?”

John Kerry of the US State Department on human threat on our oceans and how we might protect it:

From the ourocean2014.state.gov webpage:

“Our ocean today is at grave risk – and it’s not happening by accident. Human activity is the cause. Harmful fishing practices, even illegal fishing; giant garbage patches; hundreds of dead zones; and rising carbon dioxide levels – all of it threatens life under the sea. That’s the bad news. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be that way. Governments, communities, and individuals can act now to reverse these trends. We can protect the ocean if we all start treating it like ‘our ocean.’”

‘The US Department of State will host the “Our Ocean” Conference on 16 & 17 June (#OurOcean2014). Invited individuals, experts, practitioners, advocates, lawmakers, and the international ocean and foreign policy communities will gather lessons learned, share the best science, offer unique perspectives, and demonstrate effective action.

They aim to chart a way forward, working individually and together, to protect “Our Ocean.”’

The conference will be accessible on the internet.

They add, “wherever you live, you can help in some way. We can make a healthier ocean, for this generation and those to come.”
And ask. “What will you do to help protect our ocean?

“Show your support and tell others how you’ll make this commitment…”

  • I will let my national and local leaders know that protecting our ocean is important to me.
  • I will ask whether my seafood has been caught in a sustainable manner.
  • I will not eat shark fin soup.
  • I will not throw trash into our ocean or waterways.
  • I will volunteer at least one day a year to help clean our waterways or beaches.

Visit ourocean2014.state.gov/#s-action to make your pledge and help raise awareness of the conference and the awareness of marine pollution,sustainable fisheries and ocean acidification by joining the Thunderclap!

Our Ocean

Not there? Follow tweeps at the 2012 Ocean Sciences Meeting at landlocked Salt Lake City!

Tweeting from the 2012 Ocean Sciences Meeting, 20-24 February 2012, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, with the tag: #oceans2012 are –

You can use the tag search #oceans2012 to scroll back to catchup with the tweets due to the time difference – and find more who are discussing the conference proceedings.

It’s obviously not as good as the real thing but we can’t all be there at Salt Lake City. When you are enjoying the live tweets amidst the daily grind, do say thanks to all these science communicators!