July 2018 sampling events for NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme

PUgroupphoto

Participants of 12 May 2018 sampling at Noordin Beach, Pulau Ubin.

Are you concerned about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

Join us in the upcoming sampling events for July 2018!
No prior experience is required, just your interest and attention to details and data accuracy! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided. Please click on the links below to register.

  1. Selimang Beach on 07 July 2018, Saturday, 8:30am – 11:00am: https://marinedebrissampling07jul2018.eventbrite.sg
  2. Pulau Ubin on 08 July 2018, Sunday, 8:30am – 11:30am: https://marinedebrissampling08jul2018.eventbrite.sg
  3. Lim Chu Kang Beach and Mangrove, 21 July 2018, Saturday, 9:30am – 12:00pm https://marinedebrissampling21jul2018.eventbrite.sg

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that was recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from six sites every alternate month. These data collected would supplement the annual ICCS data and form the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore which would help inform marine debris management.

microplastics

A pile of microplastics collected using a sieve. Microplastics is ubiquitous and include plastics that were originally manufactured small and those that come from the breaking up of plastic products.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒40 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal and marine environment!

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May 2018 sampling events for NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme

PU 10 Feb 2018

Participants of 10 Feb 2018 sampling at Noordin Beach, Pulau Ubin.

Are you concerned about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

Join us in the upcoming sampling events for May 2018!
No prior experience is required, just your interest! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided. Please click on the links below to register.

  1. Pulau Ubin on 12 May 2018, Saturday, 9:00am – 12:00pm:
    https://marinedebrissampling12may2018.eventbrite.sg
  2. Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal Beach on 20 May 2018, Sunday, 9:00am – 12:00pm:
    https://marinedebrissampling20may2018.eventbrite.sg

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that is recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from six sites every alternate month. These data collected would supplement the annual ICCS data and form the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore which would help inform marine debris management.

SJI-mp sampling

Collection of microplastic sample using household sieve.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒40 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal and marine environment!

Apr 2018 sampling events for NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme

 

SE group photo

Participants of the 14 Jan 2018 sampling at Selimang Beach.

Are you concerned about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

Join us in the upcoming sampling events for April 2018!
No prior experience is required, just your interest! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided. Please click on the links below to register.

1. Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal Beach on 07 April 2018, Saturday, 8:30am – 11:30am:
https://marinedebrissampling07apr2018.eventbrite.sg
2. Pasir Ris Park Beach on 14 April 2018, Saturday, 3:00pm – 6:00pm:
https://marinedebrissampling14apr2018.eventbrite.sg

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that is recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from six sites every alternate month. These data collected would provide recommendations to decision-making by forming the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore and supplementing the annual ICCS data.

SJI-mp sampling

Collection of microplastic sample using household sieve.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒40 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal and marine environment!

Feb 2018 sampling events for NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme

TFnov2018

Participants of the 25 Nov 2017 sampling at Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal.

Are you concern about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

Join us in the upcoming sampling events for Feb 2018!
No prior experience is required, just your interest! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided. Please click on the links below to register.

  1. Pulau Ubin on 10 Feb 2018, Saturday, 9:00am – 12:00pm:
    https://marinedebrissampling10feb2018.eventbrite.sg (fully subscribed)
  2. Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal Beach on 25 Feb 2018, Sunday, 8:30am – 11:30am: https://marinedebrissampling25feb2018.eventbrite.sg

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that is recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from nine sites every month. These data collected would provide recommendations to decision-making by forming the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore and supplementing the annual ICCS data.

SJI-mp sampling

Collection of microplastic sample using household sieve.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒40 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal marine environment!

Jan 2018 sampling events for NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme

TM7 trash 2017

Are you concern about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

Join us in the upcoming sampling events for Jan 2018!
No prior experience is required, just your interest! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided. Please click on the links below to register.

  1. Selimang Beach on 14 Jan 2018, Sunday, 2:45pm – 5:30pm: https://marinedebrissampling14jan2018.eventbrite.sg
  2. Pulau Ubin on 20 Jan 2018, Saturday, 2:00pm – 5:30pm:
    https://marinedebrissampling20jan2018.eventbrite.sg

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that is recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from nine sites every month. These data collected would provide recommendations to decision-making by forming the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore and supplementing the annual ICCS data.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒40 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal marine environment!

Be a part of the NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

TM7 trash 2017

Are you concern about marine trash and want to do more than just a cleanup? Then join us in the 2017–2019 NUS–NParks Marine Debris Monitoring Programme!

What is it about?
It is a citizen science programme that is recently initiated to engage volunteers, schools, and organizations with an interest to survey and collect data on marine debris found on Singapore’s beaches. Click on this link or the tab above to find out more!

What will we collect and why?
Data on both macro-debris (>5 mm) and microplastics (1 – 5 mm) will be collected from nine sites every month. These data collected would provide recommendations to decision-making by forming the national baseline of marine debris for Singapore and supplementing the annual ICCS data.

How can I get involved?
For individuals who are interested in participating in the data collection exercises, please sign up with this form to receive updates of monthly sampling events.

For schools / organisation, sign up with this form for the programme with 20‒60 participants and you will be guided through the data collection exercise. A research sampling kit and cleanup supplies could be loaned as required.

Join us in the upcoming sampling events!
No prior experience is required, just your interest! Briefing and sampling supplies would be provided.

  1. Beach at Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal on 25 Nov 2017 (Sat) 8:30am – 11:30am: https://marinedebrissampling25nov2017.eventbrite.sg
  2. Changi Beach, Carpark 6 on 29 Nov 2017 (Wed) 8:30am – 11:30am: https://marinedebrissampling29nov2017.eventbrite.sg
  3. East Coast Park Area C on 30 Nov 2017 (Thu) 8:30am – 11:30am: https://marinedebrissampling30nov2017.eventbrite.sg
  4. Coney Island, Beach A on 02 Dec 2017 (Sat) 3:00pm – 6:00pm: https://marinedebrissampling02dec2017.eventbrite.sg

For more information on this programme, please contact Joleen at joleen.chan@nus.edu.sg

Thank you for caring for the coastal marine environment!

“Debris ingestion by sea turtles is a global phenomenon of increasing magnitude”

Schuyler, Q., B. D. Hardesty, C. Wilcox & K. Townsend, 2013. Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles. Conservation Biology, open-access, early-view article (free download).

[The authors] “analyzed 37 studies published from 1985 to 2012 that report on data collected from before 1900 through 2011.

Turtles in nearly all regions studied ingest debris, but the probability of ingestion was not related to modeled debris densities.

Furthermore, smaller, oceanic-stage turtles were more likely to ingest debris than coastal foragers, whereas carnivorous species were less likely to ingest debris than herbivores or gelatinovores.

… oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of both lethal and sublethal effects from ingested marine debris.

To reduce this risk, anthropogenic debris must be managed at a global level.”

Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles

Global analysis of anthropogenic debris ingestion by sea turtles

The authors raised several points about debris management:

  1. “Standardized reporting methods on debris effects on wildlife, including debris type and size, species, and life-history stage of animals affected, would go a long way toward creating a globally consistent and comparable data set.
  2. Increased efforts to understand debris effects in underresearched areas where turtles occur in great numbers (especially Southeast Asia, western and northern Australia, South America, and Africa), and in mid-ocean pelagic turtles would be beneficial.
  3. Our results show clearly that debris ingestion by sea turtles is a global phenomenon of increasing magnitude. Our finding that oceanic-stage green and leatherback turtles are at higher risk than benthic-feeding carnivorous turtles means management actions to target these species and life stages should be considered. This is particularly important for leatherback turtles that spend the bulk of their lives in oceanic waters, and are listed as critically endangered (IUCN 2012).
  4. Ingestion prevalence at stranding locations was not related to predicted debris density, likely due to the long migrations of turtles. Thus, conducting coastal cleanups will not solve the problem of debris accumulation in the pelagic environment, where animals are most commonly affected, although it is an important step in preventing marine debris input into the ocean.
  5. Anthropogenic debris is not only a problem for endangered turtles and other marine wildlife, but also affects human health and safety (e.g., discarded sharps and medical waste and ship encounters with large items). Debris also has aesthetic and economic consequences and may result in decreased tourism (Ballance et al. 2000), reduced economic benefits from fisheries (Havens et al. 2008), and damage to vessels (Jones 1995). Furthermore, debris destroys habitats and aids in the transport of invasive species (Sheavly & Register 2007). It is therefore a high priority to address this global problem.
  6. An estimated 80% of debris comes from land-based sources; hence, it is critical to implement effective waste management strategies and to create and maintain a global survey and comprehensive database of marine debris ingestion and entanglement.
  7. Additionally, it is worth engaging with industry to create and implement appropriate innovations and controls to assist in decreasing marine debris.”
Green Turtle 01
Photo by Rafn Ingi Finnsson